Walking on Water, er, Oobleck - The Science Chicago Finale

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Science Chicago held their public outreach finale this afternoon in Millennium Park.  It was beyond fantastic.

Several thousand people turned out for a huge array of engaging science activities. Dinosaurs, liquid nitrogen demos, kazoos made of tongue depressors and rubber bands, magic with Sharpie ink (thanks, Mike Davis!), and a live PBS television Design Squad show were just a few of the highlights. As a science educator, it was really neat to see so many engaged kids (and parents!).

My personal highlight was the kiddie pool of oobleck. This stuff is just amazing (read my previous post for more). Made of two parts corn starch and one part water, it's a fun science activity you can do at home.

Or, as Science Chicago did, use a cement mixer and 800 pounds of corn starch to create an entire pool of the stuff.

Running or bounding across the surface was, according to my excited seven year-old, like walking on water. As you can see, adults enjoyed it, too.

One poor kid stopped mid-pool and sank surprisingly quickly. He had to be yanked out by two volunteers, legs covered in the gooey stuff.

Hats off to Cheryl Hughes, Rabiah Mayas, and the entire crew at Science Chicago for a terrific day!

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