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Beth Herbert

Beth Herbert came to Northwestern University in 2005 as an administrator in the Department of Neurobiology and Physiology, where the Science in Society intiative originated. She came to the Center for Genetic Medicine in 2007, where she is currently the associate director of communications. At Science in Society, she serves as the associate editor, which involves working closely with faculty, staff and students to develop content for the site, and overseeing the Science in Society Blog.

Beth graduated from the University of Cincinnati with a BA in English and a minor in journalism. She is currently an MFA student in Northwestern's creative writing program.

Email: 

Phone: 

(312) 503-2072

Address: 

303 E. Superior St., Lurie 6-125, Chicago, IL 60611

Content by Beth Herbert

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We rely on plants for almost all of our most basic needs: the air we breathe, the food we eat, shelter from the elements, and even medicines. Learning more about the biology, evolution, and cultivation of the nearly 400,000 known plant species that cover our planet will help us better conserve and utilize our essential green neighbors.

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Luis Amaral, Northwestern University professor of chemical and biological engineering, studies complex systems: sociological, biological and technological constructs made up of countless interconnected components that adapt and change with time.

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How would you like to sit with this guy on the train? (Photo by Annie Mole/Flickr)

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In partnership with the Initiative for Sustainability and Energy at Northwestern (ISEN), Science in Society (SiS) will profile four innovators in the area of energy and sustainability – researchers who are harnessing the power of science and engineering to better understand and even solve some of the many challenges facing our planet. This week we feature ISEN award recipient Neal Blair, professor of civil and environmental engineering and of Earth and planetary sciences.

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When I talk to fellow nonscientists about my job here at SiS, I find that many folks are most interested in topics that span the murky divide between things like nature and nurture, the conscious a

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In the late 1990s, two separate research teams—the High-Z Supernova Search Team and the Supernova Cosmology Project—presented data, gathered by studying exploding stars, that brought with it a startling implication: our universe is expanding at an accelerating rate.

Since this game-changing discovery, for which three researchers were just awarded the 2011 Nobel Prize in Physics, scientists around the world have been using increasingly sophisticated technology to form a more precise picture of this cosmic expansion, and why exactly it’s speeding up.

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Treating people with cancer is about more than just fighting the disease itself. At the Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center of Northwestern University, a team of psychologists, psychiatrists, social workers, dieticians, and patient navigators work together to address the many other needs that come with a cancer diagnosis.

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Skin. According to professor and head of anthropology at Pennsylvania State University Nina Jablonski, it is one of our most underappreciated organs, and one to be celebrated. It is at once a connector and protector, allowing us to feel and experience our world while protecting us from many of its harsh elements. It plays an active role in our culture, serving as a biological billboard of make-up, tattoos, paints and piercings.  

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This summer, in partnership with the Initiative for Sustainability and Energy at Northwestern (ISEN), Science in Society (SiS) will profile four innovators in the area of energy and sustainability – researchers who are harnessing the power of science and engineering to better understand and even solve some of the many challenges facing our planet. This week we feature assistant professor of earth and planetary sciences and ISEN-award recipient Francesca McInerney.