Daniel Peake

Content by Daniel Peake

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http://scienceinsociety.northwestern.edu/sites/default/files/images/PET_..." alt="Parkinson's disease affects people's ability to recognize emotions.

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“Shock.” 

That was Ann Brendel’s reaction when Jack, her only child, was diagnosed with autism at the age of three.

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People with Parkinson’s disease often can’t differentiate between a sweet smile or an angry grimace, a warm welcome or a rude remark. And one of the major treatments may be making this worse, according to new research. 

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Meet Camelia Kuhnen, neuroeconomist. You may not have heard of her yet, but her work is even more intriguing than her title.

The 31-year-old wunderkind of money and mind is a pioneer in the promising new field of neurofinance – a seemingly odd fusion of economics with neuroscience and psychology.

Kuhnen, who grew up in Romania, has been working in this field since she was an undergraduate at MIT. She earned a PhD in finance from Stanford and became an assistant professor of finance at Northwestern University in 2006.

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Developments in electrical stimulation treatment for the brain may offer hope to people suffering from a variety of disorders.

The technique can ease symptoms of depression, epilepsy, obsessive-compulsive disorder, headaches, chronic pain and stroke that have not responded well to other treatments, according to new and increasing research.