Jogging in High Heels

By: 

It’s time to swap your running shoes for a pair of…high heels?  A recent article in Scientific American reported that not only does wearing running shoes cause increased joint torque at the hip, knee, and ankle but even jogging in high heels is better for joints.  So much for those fancy running shoes.

A study in Nature found 70-80% of runners who wear shoes land heel-first, whereas barefoot runners usually land toward the middle or front of the foot. (See pictures in the Scientific American article.)  Daniel Lieberman, a Harvard University professor and an author of this study, remarked, “People who don’t wear shoes when they run have an astonishingly different strike.”  Well, so what?


Barefooot runners reduce impact by pointing their toes more at landing, preventing a sudden stop. On the other hand (or foot in this case), landing on the heel when running without shoes is painful and can translate into a collision force 1.5 to 3 times the runner’s body weight.  With the development of cushioned shoes, this initial pain has disappeared, and a high-impact, injury-inducing running style that human physiology cannot tolerate has emerged.

Christopher McDougall, an avid runner and author of the best-selling book Born to Run, had been plagued by running injuries until he visited the Tarahumara Indians of Mexico, a tribe known for running long distances while only wearing thin-soled sandals.  In this article, he argues that running doesn’t inherently cause injuries and that running has only recently become associated with pain and injury.  To hear more about McDougall’s story, check out this video.

Despite this evidence, I’m not quite ready to hit the ground running.  Looking for a compromise between no shoes and barefoot running, I found FiveFinger footwear.  These sock-like shoes allow the benefits of barefoot running while providing protection for your feet.  Don’t expect to find me running barefoot in the snow anytime soon, but barefoot running or running with FiveFinger footwear looks promising.

- blog authored by Kelsie Eichel

Topic: 

Tags: 

Comments

On the other hand (or foot in this case), landing on the heel when running without shoes is painful and can translate into a collision force 1.5 to 3 times the runner’s body weight. With the development of cushioned shoes, this initial pain has disappeared, and a high-impact, injury-inducing running style that human physiology cannot tolerate has emerged.

As a retailer of high heel shoes we get a small group of customers asking for recommendations of "stripper shoes" they can run in... Needless to say we recommend the lower ones with ankle support if we had to pick a pair of heels to run in.

Apparently there are short races as well as marathons all across the country where high heels are the required footwear. I've seen some video clips of such races and it's amazing how fast you see some women run in 5"+ heels!

Barefooot runners reduce impact by pointing their toes more at landing, preventing a sudden stop. On the other hand (or foot in this case), landing on the heel when running without shoes is painful and can translate into a collision force 1.5 to 3 times the runner’s body weight. With the development of cushioned shoes, this initial pain has disappeared, and a high-impact, injury-inducing running style that human physiology cannot tolerate has emerged.

Christopher McDougall, an avid runner and author of the best-selling book Born to Run, had been plagued by running injuries until he visited the Tarahumara Indians of Mexico, a tribe known for running long distances while only wearing thin-soled sandals.

These sock-like shoes allow the benefits of barefoot running while providing protection for your feet. Don’t expect to find me running barefoot in the snow anytime soon, but barefoot running or running with FiveFinger footwear looks promising.

Despite this evidence, I’m not quite ready to hit the ground running. Looking for a compromise between no shoes and barefoot running, I found FiveFinger footwear. These sock-like shoes allow the benefits of barefoot running while providing protection for your feet. Don’t expect to find me running barefoot in the snow anytime soon, but barefoot running or running with FiveFinger footwear looks promising.

I have been running in my Vibram shoes for about a year now and I have no back pain like I used to get when running.

I have tried sock like shoes and i am not convinced that these running socks are for me.I suppose every body's different i prefer a cushioned pair of running shoes nice and light.I do not seem to suffer with back pains unless i run in hard sole running shoes.Running in hard sole shoes seems like your feet take a pounding there's nothing absorbing your feet hitting the hard ground.

Add new comment

Filtered HTML

  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Allowed HTML tags: <a> <em> <strong> <cite> <blockquote> <code> <ul> <ol> <li> <dl> <dt> <dd> <p> <div> <br> <sup> <sub>
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.

Plain text

  • No HTML tags allowed.
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.
CAPTCHA
This question is for testing whether or not you are a human visitor and to prevent automated spam submissions.