HONORABLE MENTION - Vikaś Nandwana: Magnetic Honeycomb

The microscopic particles shown here are made of iron oxide, or rust, just like on a car. But these nanoparticles are tiny, 100,000 times thinner than a sheet of paper.

In this image all the nanoparticles are the same size and shape and distance apart, and each magnetic particle is subjected to the attraction and repulsion forces of its neighbors. As a result, the magnetic nano-particles self-assemble (or come together) in a closely-packed honeycomb pattern. 

Iron oxide nanoparticles like these are already used to help people suffering from anemia, or iron deficiency. Researchers study how these magnetic nanoparticles interact with each other and with tissues in the body, which can open new avenues for nontoxic, targeted tests and treatments for cancer, Alzheimer’s and cardiovascular disease.

Northwestern University Atomic & Nanoscale Characterization Experimental Center (NUANCE)

Tools & Techniques: Transmission Electron Microscope + colored in Photoshop

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